FASTER school defense training system

Here's a link to a post at Reason about the FASTER program to train teachers and school administrators how to respond to "active shooter" events. The program apparently covers both defensive use of weapons by school staff and first-aid treatment of gunshot wounds. From the article:

For many years there has been debate about allowing teachers to be armed to protect students. This post describes an established training program for teachers who choose to do so in compliance with school rules. The program is FASTER—short for Faculty/Administrator Safety Training & Emergency Response. Introduced in Ohio, FASTER could be adopted by every state and school, at no cost to taxpayers, and at considerable saving of lives.

I'm not so sure about the "no cost to taxpayers" part, since the FASTER pages linked in the article mention $1,000/trainee fee. But there are buttons for donations or sponsoring a trainee. I can't vouch for the effectiveness of this particular program, but it's definitely on the right track.


As I've said before, anyone hired as a teacher or administrator of a children's school--and indeed anyone with responsibility for a group of children--must be able to answer this question:

What do you do when a killer walks into the room?

Any answer that requires waiting fails. This includes: waiting another minute (or ten?) for the cops to arrive, or waiting for the government to pass another law, or waiting for a better mental health system to be built. Any answer that involves martyring oneself as an unarmed human shield also fails. Any answer that involves the sensibility, "teachers shouldn't have to do that," fails most miserably.


The FASTER program at least points us in the right direction. But I've noted before, and it's still true: attitude trumps training. People without the courage to act in a crisis will fail, no matter how impressive their training certificate looks.


Hire for attitude, then train.


Note: use the links in the Reason article to go to the FASTER sites.


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